Easy Pickled Eggs Recipe

Easy Pickled Eggs Recipe

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I have been, or can be if you click on a link and make a purchase, compensated via a cash payment, gift, or something else of value for writing this post. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.

If you are getting lots of eggs from your chickens, you might be wondering what to do with them all. Your family is probably tired of eating plain eggs all the time, right? Why not try switching it up a bit and try making these easy pickled eggs?

Normal hard boiled eggs only last in the fridge for one week. But pickled eggs can be stored in the fridge for 3-4 months!

Pickling eggs has been done for hundreds of years. Before refrigerators, people commonly use pickling to help preserve their food for longer periods. Now, since we have more cold storage options, people more often practice pickling for the flavor.

Pickled eggs are a common sight at bars, grocery stores, and delis. They are a great high-protein snack. And they are so easy to make!

For this episode of the Self Reliant Skill of the Week, I am pickling eggs for my very first time. This project was definitely one of my easiest. If you’ve watched my videos, you know that most of my projects have at least 1 thing go wrong with them. But honestly, the hardest part of this one was peeling my hard boiled farm fresh eggs!

To pickle eggs, you need a basic vinegar brine. Then you can customize it with whatever spices you want.

The first step in these easy pickled eggs is to hard boil them

Basic brine for easy pickled eggs

Here is a very basic brine recipe for pickling eggs:

  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 Tbsp. salt (non-iodized is best)
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar
  • Spices

Bring the vinegar, water, salt, and sugar to a low boil, then reduce to a simmer. Let simmer for about 2 minutes to dissolve the sugar and salt, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. This recipe will be about the right amount for 8-12 eggs in a quart jar.

Brine recipe for bread and butter pickled eggs

Bread and butter pickled eggs normally have a more sweet/sour combination, so the brine is adjusted accordingly. Here is a basic brine for bread and butter pickled eggs.

  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • Spices

Bring the vinegar, salt, and sugar to a low boil, then reduce to a simmer. Let simmer for about 2 minutes to dissolve the sugar and salt, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. This recipe will be about the right amount for 8-12 eggs in a quart jar.

Directions

Hard boil and peel 1 dozen eggs. Simmer the brine mixture as described above. Put 8-12 peeled eggs in a glass 1-quart jar. If adding onions or peppers, layer them between and around the eggs. Put desired spices in the jar. Pour prepared brine mixture into the jar. Place lid on the jar, allow to cool slightly, then put in the fridge.

As long as the eggs are completely submerged in the brine, your pickled eggs will last 3-4 months in the fridge. It is NOT recommended to can them.

Spices to use for pickled eggs

You can really get creative with your spices, and make your eggs taste the way you like them best! Typically you’ll want to use about 1 teaspoon of each spice.

If you prefer, you can use pickling spice that you get at the store. But adding your own individual spices will most likely be cheaper and give you more flexibility. Pickling spice usually has mustard seed, allspice, coriander, bay leaves, and sometimes cinnamon and cloves.

For pickled eggs with a spicy kick, try jalapenos, onions, red pepper flakes, or horseradish. Whole black peppercorns and even hot sauce would be good to add to spicy eggs too.

Some people really enjoy pickled beet eggs, which have an earthy-sweet flavor and beautiful magenta color. Pickled beet eggs use beet juice or the water from boiling beets instead of plain water in the brine, and usually more sugar as well. Cinnamon and cloves are good spice additions to pickled beet eggs.

Beet pickled eggs are very popular

Here are the 2 types of pickled eggs that I tried for my very first time, in the video.

Dill pickled eggs

Of course, dill pickled eggs are the classic recipe. You can buy the dill pickling spice, but it’s really easy to just formulate your own!

This is what I used:

  • Basic vinegar brine (above)
  • 1/3 cup sliced pickled red onions
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ground mustard (mustard seeds would make it less cloudy)
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 teaspoon coriander
  • 1 teaspoon dill

Sprigs of fresh dill would be a pretty addition as well, but I didn’t have any so I left them out.

This is the recipe you’ll want to use for 1 quart, and about 8-12 eggs. It can easily be doubled or tripled to make a bigger batch.

Allow to sit in the fridge for 7-10 days before eating to let the flavors infuse. Keep in the fridge and use within 4 months.

Bread and butter pickled eggs

I love bread and butter pickles, so I just had to make bread and butter pickled eggs! I debated using some of my bread and butter pickling spice, but I had all the individual spices needed for it so I’ll save the ready-made stuff for my cucumbers later in the year.

  • Bread and butter vinegar brine (above)
  • 1/3 cup sliced pickled red onions
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ground mustard or mustard seed
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric

The turmeric is optional but gives a good flavor and wonderful color.

This is the recipe you’ll want to use for 1 quart, and about 8-12 eggs. It can easily be doubled or tripled to make a bigger batch.

Allow to sit in the fridge for 7-10 days before eating to let the flavors infuse. Keep in the fridge and use within 4 months.

Pickling eggs is so easy!

Pickling eggs is such a fun, easy project. I didn’t even mess it up for once! Here is the video of me pickling eggs for the very first time:

Are you going to try pickling eggs for long term storage? Have you done it before? Tell us in the comments!

Oh, and if you have tips for hard boiling and peeling farm fresh eggs, please share them in the comments too!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *